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Well, We’re Waiting…

I know I haven't made an official post since Norv and AJ were canned on New Year's Eve.  According to NFL Playoff Betting Lines, Denver is favored to win it all.  While they're the only team I don't want to see win the Super Bowl, I can't really get too upset about it.  I wrote a piece over at Bleacher Report on the quandry over how much of an effect a coach can have.  FAITHFUL READERS will be familiar with the lesson on the last ten years of Charger history, since you lived it with me.  I really get the feeling that Spanos will hire a coach somewhere between retread and rock star.  If it's the right guy for the job, I'll be ok with it. 

I guess this part of the aforementioned Bleacher Report piece serves as my official eulogy for Norv:

During his first two seasons as Charger coach, Turner’s teams did seem capable of going to the next level.  While I never thought he was a good coach, I could not argue that the team seemed like it might be finally learning its lesson.  However, its final playoff pratfall changed everything.

LaDainian Tomlinson was let go, but the other parts stayed in place.  That began the regular-season slide that has led us here.  Jon Gruden might be the only guy who would excite the fan base, but can he become the first coach to win a Lombardi Trophy with a second team?

Mind you, I don’t think Gruden will coach anywhere this year.  But I disagree with those who say he simply took Tony Dungy’s team to a championship.  Before Gruden, the Bucs could not get past the Eagles in the playoffs.  After helping them do that, Gruden provided invaluable inside info against his former team in the Super Bowl.

The Chargers might actually find a coach who’s right for the job this time.  Whether they will assemble a team that is up to the challenge is another story.  If history has shown us anything, it’s that the right man needs to find the right team at the right time.

Like you, I roll my eyes at talk of Jim Mora, Lovie Smith or any other guy who got fired from his last job.  But that's happened the best of them.  From what I've seen of the playoffs thus far, the Bolts have a lot of holes to fill before they can seriously make a run.  I was half-joking when I Tweeted that Philip Rivers should wear the gloves full time as Kurt Warner did in Arizona.  He said on the Darren Smith show that he's not entirely sold on wearing them, but that he's considering it.  The only game after Pittsburgh that he didn't wear them was the one he played like shit in against Carolina.  Not surprisingly, that's the one we lost.

The speculation is that Dean Spanos will anounce a new GM by the end of the day.  Kevin Acee is reporting that there are "a lot of moving parts," which means that the hire is contingent on other teams' personnel moves.  When things start to really happen, I'll weigh in.  Talk to you then.

RLW

PS Thanks to the member of the CMB, who's avatar this is.

About Ross Warner

ROSS WARNER is a forty-three year old freelancer whose credits include Sports Illustrated OnLine and Blitz as well as numerous articles on his favorite band, the Grateful Dead. Blah, Blah, Blah. Yeah, I was on WNEW FM the morning after the Chargers made the Super Bowl. Having returned from Pittsburgh only hours before, there I was at half-court at Madison Square Garden in my #12 jersey and wiping my sweat with a "Terrible Towel." When asked about the future for the newly-crowned AFC Champs, I simply uttered "justice is coming." Like so many others, I first took notice of the Chargers during the "Air Coryell" period of the late 1970s. But as Dan Fouts gave way to Ed Luther, Mark Hermann, Babe Laufenberg, Jim McMahon, David Archer, Mark Vlasic, Billy Joe Tolliver and John Freisz my fanaticism turned to obsession. When Stan Humphries resurrected the franchise in 1992, I began calling the Chargers organization to share my plan to get the team into the Super Bowl. This began the stormy rapport with the Chargers' Public Relations staff which reached a boiling point at a 1996 "team spirit" luncheon when I demanded that guard Eric Moten explain his propensity for holding penalties. It was then I realized I needed my own forum. Founded in 1995, Justice Is Coming is precisely that. To decide whether this site is for you, ask yourself these questions: Do you think of Johnny Unitas as an ex-Charger? Are your three children named JJ, Kellen and Wes, with one of them being a girl? Do you think that Rolf Benirschke got a raw deal on the daytime "Wheel of Fortune?" Can you remember where you were on December 3, 1984 when Bobby Duckworth fumbled the ball attempting to spike it on "Monday Night Football?" Does Al Davis, a dark alley and a lead pipe mean anything to you? If you answered "yes" to any of the above questions, then you, too, believe that Justice Is Coming. This is a weekly look at the San Diego Chargers through the eyes of someone who spends most of his time thinking about the Bolts so you don't have to. But being a Chargers fan is not an obligation, although it sometimes feels like it. So I offer you this "alternative perspective." All the football, film and music collides in the centrifuge that is my brain and this newsletter is the result.

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