stan_humphries_1995_01_24

It Doesn’t Feel Like Super Sunday Any More

There was a time where I used to say that the Super Bowl was the greatest day of the year.  But that was before the Chargers started making the playoffs.  Once they did, but were unable to do anything with it, Super Sunday stopped being special.  It became a day that reminded me of everything that the Bolts were lacking. 

Now we’re coming off three straight seasons of not even getting into the playoffs.  I can’t help but think about that Thursday Night game against the Niners in 2010.  Remember when Charger fans booed Vernon Davis because he intimated that he was better than Antonio Gates?  That was also the game where Alex Smith confessed to being a huge fan of the '94 Bolts.  You know, I like Alex Smith and not just because of that admission.  I actually believe that he will continue his improvement.  I don't think that reuniting with Norv in Cleveland will be good for him, but I would actually be a little worried if he ends up in Kansas City.  That's also a reflection of the lack of confidence that I have in our quarterback right now.  It might seem shocking to be singing the praises of Alex Smith while simultaneously worrying about the future of Philip Rivers.  It would have been close to unthinkable in 2010.

I remember Marty Caswell tweeting from the sidelines about what a mess San Fran was that night.  There was a heavy suggestion that Mike Singeltary had no control of his team.  Now look at them.  Maybe we should have paid closer attention to Harbaugh when he was in San Diego.  He played well enough in 1999 that I temporarily forgot about the Wild Card loss to Indy at home.  Who knows what future coaching geniuses are carrying clipboards for the Bolts?  Could Dave Dickenson be next?  If that name means something to you, you're in the right place.

How many times do you think it will be mentioned on Sunday that the Niners were last in the Super Bowl against the Chargers?  How many times do you think we'll have to be reminded that Super Bowl XXIX was won by San Francisco by a score of 49-26?  I bet it will be referenced more than the fact that Carmen Policy make a mockery of the salary cap to assemble that team.  Yeah, I'm still more than a little peeved.  Remember that I had to watch that one in person.

Anyway, I'll talk to you after Sunday.

JIC,
RLW

About Ross Warner

ROSS WARNER is a forty-three year old freelancer whose credits include Sports Illustrated OnLine and Blitz as well as numerous articles on his favorite band, the Grateful Dead. Blah, Blah, Blah. Yeah, I was on WNEW FM the morning after the Chargers made the Super Bowl. Having returned from Pittsburgh only hours before, there I was at half-court at Madison Square Garden in my #12 jersey and wiping my sweat with a "Terrible Towel." When asked about the future for the newly-crowned AFC Champs, I simply uttered "justice is coming." Like so many others, I first took notice of the Chargers during the "Air Coryell" period of the late 1970s. But as Dan Fouts gave way to Ed Luther, Mark Hermann, Babe Laufenberg, Jim McMahon, David Archer, Mark Vlasic, Billy Joe Tolliver and John Freisz my fanaticism turned to obsession. When Stan Humphries resurrected the franchise in 1992, I began calling the Chargers organization to share my plan to get the team into the Super Bowl. This began the stormy rapport with the Chargers' Public Relations staff which reached a boiling point at a 1996 "team spirit" luncheon when I demanded that guard Eric Moten explain his propensity for holding penalties. It was then I realized I needed my own forum. Founded in 1995, Justice Is Coming is precisely that. To decide whether this site is for you, ask yourself these questions: Do you think of Johnny Unitas as an ex-Charger? Are your three children named JJ, Kellen and Wes, with one of them being a girl? Do you think that Rolf Benirschke got a raw deal on the daytime "Wheel of Fortune?" Can you remember where you were on December 3, 1984 when Bobby Duckworth fumbled the ball attempting to spike it on "Monday Night Football?" Does Al Davis, a dark alley and a lead pipe mean anything to you? If you answered "yes" to any of the above questions, then you, too, believe that Justice Is Coming. This is a weekly look at the San Diego Chargers through the eyes of someone who spends most of his time thinking about the Bolts so you don't have to. But being a Chargers fan is not an obligation, although it sometimes feels like it. So I offer you this "alternative perspective." All the football, film and music collides in the centrifuge that is my brain and this newsletter is the result.

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